Friday, February 23, 2024

Chilipepper's Paintings On Display

(Left to right) 1. "Her Arrangement" by Chilipepper (20x24-inch acrylic painting). 2. "Hello Green Breeze" by Chilipepper (20x24-inch acrylic painting). 3. "Spring Vibes" by Chilipepper (20x24-inch acrylic painting).

by Glenn Franco Simmons

A Northern Nevada painter whose art I saw and enjoyed in Reno is quite prolific and popular and she may be better known by her nickname.

Yasuyo Corbett’s nickname is Chilipepper because “as I am told I can be Spicy,” states Corbett on her website.

“From Lake Tahoe to Tokyo, to New York, Los Angeles, Shanghai and my art has taken me all over the world,” she noted.

Corbett “was born in Osaka, Japan surrounded by all the beauty of the Japanese culture,” according to the website.

Trained in “Kimonos and traditional flower arrangements,” Corbett said on her website, “this is when I first experienced joy in expressing my emotions with colors. “Everything Consists of Love" is the title of the brightly colored painting on the left, as an example of her style.

“I was fortunate to keep art in the forefront of my life, working as a visual merchandiser,” Corbett stated. “I am incredibly pleased that my love of creating and working with color has continued throughout my life and enabled me to experience so many amazing places in the world.”

How to pronounce Yasuyo? “YA SU YO,” but Corbett goes by her nickname, as previously noted, for her business: “Chilipepper’s Paintings.”

Corbett said she found herself in Lake Tahoe because she “met the love of my life, my husband,” according to the website. “I love living in Lake Tahoe.”

The Northern Nevada artist still visits and exhibits in Tokyo twice annually, according to the website.

“I feel extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to grow my art in the United States,” she stated on her website. “I work in acrylic gouache and acrylic paints. I enjoy rich, deep colors and playing with how they can provide an immersive and sometimes playful experience. I hope you enjoy my artwork, a representation of the Japanese experience in the U.S.”

Her art is enjoyed! It sure was a feast for the eyes as I sipped my bubbling Kombucha and Kathleen enjoyed her delicious coffee.

Bear portrait, "Always Be Here For You," by Chilipepper (18x24-inch acrylic painting). 3. Bear portrait, "Coffee For You," by Chilipepper (18x24-inch acrylic painting). 3. Bear portrait, "Old Photograph," by Chilipepper (18x24-inch acrylic painting).

Corbett is also a dog-lover, as evidenced by a well-written article in “Life Hugger.” (Translate to English, if you cannot read Japanese. It is a mostly accurate translation of Japanese to English by automatic Google Translate.)

“… Yasuyo also talked about an episode {she} had with a rescue dog two years ago when {she} was recuperating from an illness,” the article states.

“‘I had to leave the hospital one day after the surgery, and the doctor told me to walk every day, so I walked alone every day holding my stomach,’” she explained to “Life Hugger.”

“‘Then, a rescue dog who lived across the street started walking with me every day. He walked ahead of me, and when I caught up with him, he walked ahead of me again. He did this every day, and before I knew it, I was able to walk long distances.’”

This journey back to health was the inspiration that further lit Yasuyo’s creativity. The painting titled “Happy Bouquet” (right) is an illustration of Chilipepper’s creativity.

Regarding her feelings when drawing a rescue dog, she was quoted in the article as having said, “‘I always draw it thinking about what it would be like if I were living with this dog. For example, if I wanted a snack for me. There is a very clear lake called Lake Tahoe, and I’m imagining playing in the water together there, jumping in, being blown by the wind, etc.’”

To read the full, excellent article and see Corbett’s paintings of dogs, please navigate to the “Life Hugger” article link above.

Wednesday, February 21, 2024

Hub Coffee Roasters A Truckee River Trail Oasis

Hub Coffee Roasters in Reno, Nev., along Riverside Drive.

by Glenn Franco Simmons

No matter what time of year one walks along Truckee River Walk, there is one place my lovely wife Kathleen and I always want to stop when we are in Reno: Hub Coffee Roasters at 727 Riverside Drive.

Hub’s motto is “We exist to bring people together,” and that is exactly what it does. Just visit Hub for a lively, pleasant experience!

Kathleen and I have only visited the riverside location, but we plan to visit both other locations and look forward to the bike store.

Hub is the perfect place for bicyclists, motorists, strollers and joggers who want a delicious cup of coffee, hot chocolate, sandwich, cold drink or some other item on this roaster’s menu featuring yummy creations.

After you quickly place your order (if the line is long, have no worries because it is one line that moves fast), you can sit comfortably in what is a coffee house and art gallery combined! No kidding! On a spring day in 2023 when Kathleen and I were there, there was beautiful art on display. The seating, while in a small area, is comfortable with access to a quaint and pleasantly clean restroom for your convenience.

Looking back toward the Wingfield Park area from Truckee River Walk roughly across the street from Hub. It is a lovely walk in almost every month of the year.

Hub has Reno roots and there is more than coffee for sale!

“Our founder Mark, along with his two kids, Joey and Jessica, opened the first HUB location in 2009 in a tiny garage in Midtown Reno — with the goal of creating a space that would foster their love of coffee, community and bikes,” states Hub’s “About” section on its website. “While we’ve moved on from that location, it lives on in our cornerstone coffee blend, Thirty-2-Cheney (and of course in our hearts) — and the original goal behind it still informs every blend, location and relationship we build today.

“We’ve since opened up three cafes that have the daily pleasure of welcoming Reno’s coffee lovers, cyclists and community members. There’s our Riverside location with its picturesque Truckee River views — and our Pine Street location in Downtown Reno (which shares a roof with our very own bike shop). Our newest location at Meadowcreek nestled in South Reno across from Reno ICE.”

Saint Thomas Aquinas Cathedral is a short walk from Hub.

A coffee shop and bike shop is quite a combination!

Hub said it started with San Franciscan roasters, which, I believe, are made in Carson City!

“Since 2012, HUB has been continuously exploring roasting and profile development techniques,” the website notes. “We started out roasting on San Franciscan roasters, an SF-1 for sample roasting and SF-25 for production batches. We still have those amazing atmospheric roasting systems, but we have added a Loring S7 Nighthawk to our roasting tool belt.”

Hub’s dedication to bringing you the best coffee is grounded in doing what is best for people and environment, according to the website.

“In addition to roasting beans and opening new locations, we’ve spent the last few years fostering deeper relationships within coffee-growing regions,” the website noted. “Mark has partnered with three Colombian coffee farms: Finca las Nubes, las Veraneras, and Purity Coffee.

“Along with the HUB team, Mark travels to origin three to four times a year and continues to learn more about the incredible places where our coffee is grown and the inspiring people who are part of its journey to your cup. We couldn’t be prouder of our founder’s journey — from acclaimed Latino business owner to coincidental translator at-origin to producer himself.”

The closed (at the time this May 2023 photo was taken) Lear Theatre is
 a very short walk from Hub Coffee Roasters.


More growth may be forthcoming in Hub’s future.

“HUB is continuously growing, and we love being a part of this awesome community,” the website states. “We’re here to be a meeting place for the creative, the driven, the passionate. Cycle over, stroll on by, and swing in — we’re happy to be your HUB.”

There are also hats, shirts and sweatshirts usually on display that bear the name of Hub. If not, one can order them through Hub’s online store, as well as coffee.

On that spring day, there were beautiful paintings by Yasuyo Corbett.

Yasuyo Corbett’s nickname is Chilipepper because “as I am told I can be Spicy,” states Corbett on her website.

“From Lake Tahoe to Tokyo, to New York, Los Angeles, Shanghai and my art has taken me all over the world,” she noted. 

(Left to right) 1. "Her Arrangement" by Chilipepper (20x24-inch acrylic painting). 2. "Hello Green Breeze" by Chilipepper (20x24-inch acrylic painting). 3. "Spring Vibes" by Chilipepper (20x24-inch acrylic painting).

Corbett “was born in Osaka, Japan surrounded by all the beauty of the Japanese culture,” according to the website.

Trained in “Kimonos and traditional flower arrangements,” Corbett said on her website, “this is when I first experienced joy in expressing my emotions with colors.

"Happy Bouquet" by Chilipepper.

“I was fortunate to keep art in the forefront of my life, working as a visual merchandiser,” Corbett stated. “I am incredibly pleased that my love of creating and working with color has continued throughout my life and enabled me to experience so many amazing places in the world.”

How to pronounce Yasuyo? YA SU YO, but Corbett goes by her nickname, as previously noted, for her business: “Chilipepper’s Paintings.”

Corbett said she found herself in Lake Tahoe because she “met the love of my life, my husband,” according to the website. “I love living in Lake Tahoe.”

The Northern Nevada artist still visits and exhibits in Tokyo twice annually, according to the website.

“I feel extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to grow my art in the United States,” she stated on her website. “I work in acrylic gouache and acrylic paints. I enjoy rich, deep colors and playing with how they can provide an immersive and sometimes playful experience. I hope you enjoy my artwork, a representation of the Japanese experience in the U.S.”

Bear portrait, "Always Be Here For You," by Chilipepper (18x24-inch acrylic painting). 3. Bear portrait, "Coffee For You," by Chilipepper (18x24-inch acrylic painting). 3. Bear portrait, "Old Photograph," by Chilipepper (18x24-inch acrylic painting).

Her art is enjoyed! It sure was a feast for the eyes as I sipped my bubbling Kombucha and Kathleen enjoyed her delicious coffee.

Corbett is also a dog-lover, as evidenced by a well-written article in “Life Hugger.” (Translate to English, if you cannot read Japanese. It is a mostly accurate translation of Japanese to English by automatic Google Translate.)

"Everything Consists of Love" by Chilipepper.

 

“… Yasuyo also talked about an episode {she} had with a rescue dog two years ago when {she} was recuperating from an illness,” the article states.

“‘I had to leave the hospital one day after the surgery, and the doctor told me to walk every day, so I walked alone every day holding my stomach, she explained to “Life Hugger.” “Then, a rescue dog who lived across the street started walking with me every day. He walked ahead of me, and when I caught up with him, he walked ahead of me again. He did this every day, and before I knew it, I was able to walk long distances.

This journey back to health was the inspiration that further lit Yasuyo’s creativity.

Regarding her feelings when drawing a rescue dog, she was quoted in the article as having said, “‘I always draw it thinking about what it would be like if I were living with this dog. For example, if I wanted a snack for me. There is a very clear lake called Lake Tahoe, and I’m imagining playing in the water together there, jumping in, being blown by the wind, etc.

To read the full, excellent article and see Corbett’s paintings of dogs, please navigate to the “Life Hugger” article link above.

Sunday, January 28, 2024

Theodore Winters' Entrepreneurship, Civic Duty & Family Dedication To Be Admired

Part of the former Winters Ranch in Washoe Valley, Nev.

by Glenn Franco Simmons

Nestled in the majestic wind-swept panorama that is the Washoe Valley in Nevada is the former Winters Ranch, which was also known as Rancho del Sierra (Sierra Ranch).

For many generations, the ranch was important to Nevadans in many respects because of the Winters' captivating history in Nevada and California.

The story of Winters Ranch can be traced to that entrepreneurial pioneer spirit that animated Western expansion.

“Winters was born in Illinois on Sept. 14, 1823, where his father, John Devers Winters, had developed a stage line and freight business in Illinois,” according to the Historical Society of Winters. “In 1848, Theodore’s father and brothers, John D. Jr. and Joseph and daughter Harriet, headed for California via the Oregon Trail and left Theodore to dispose of the family business. Theodore, who had married in 1847 to Sarah Marshall, stayed on in Illinois until the spring of 1849.

“He then brought his wife and small son, George, to California where they joined the rest of the family at Forest City, situated on the American River. … The Winters family did some mining, some farming, but mostly hauling freight to the gold fields.”

Their connection to Nevada began when gold was discovered in what became known as The Comstock Lode. The father and sons began hauling freight from Placerville, Calif., to the Carson Valley, which is south of Washoe and Eagle valleys where the family would construct their homestead, farm, racetrack and ranch.

A beautiful house on the former Winters Ranch in Washoe Valley, Nev.

The Historical Society of Winters noted that, in 1852, Sarah Winters returned to Illinois to visit her parents. 

“She arrived back in San Francisco; but, on Jan. 3, 1853, while traveling by boat to Sacramento, the vessel she was on, the ‘Comanche’ collided with another steamer, the ‘J. Bragdon,’ and sank in a few minutes. George, who was then 5, was saved, but Mrs. Winters, and 2-year-old Helen were drowned.”

Winters would eventually marry Margaret Martin and their financial fortunes improved.

“In the 1850s, the Winters family became wealthy, both from their freighting business and from interests they held in The Comstock Lode,” the society added. “Their freight line in Nevada was called ‘The Winters Express.’”

When Church of Latter-day Saints’ leader Brigham Young called for all Mormons to return Salt Lake City, Winters saw an opportunity expand his already vast holdings by purchasing land in Washoe Valley.

“He expanded his holdings until, 10 years later, he owned more than 18,000 acres in California and Nevada …,” the society stated. “About 1860 Winters began to interest himself in horse racing, with a racetrack built in Carson Valley.

“In 1864, while he was on a trip east to perfect the title to some of his lands, he stopped off in St. Louis to watch a horse race and bought his most famous racehorse ‘Norfolk,’ from Mr. R. A. Alexander, owner of the Woodburn stud farm, in Kentucky.”


He had the horse shipped to California via Panama.

“No horse was able to outrun the stallion,” according to the society. “Winters is credited with introducing thoroughbred horses to the west, and the contests between Norfolk and Lodi, a horse owned by Judge Charles Bryan, are legendary.

“The climate of Washoe Valley proved to be severe in the winter months, so in 1865, he bought 1,300 acres of land {and} 700 acres in Yolo County and 600 in Solano.”

Winters commuted between his Nevada and California properties. Even the town of Winters in California is named after him because he donated some of the land the town was built on.

“From 1865 to 1890 were the heydays of Winters’ racing stables,” the society stated. “Many famous horses were born and raised in his stables. ... Those colts that did not possess all of the desired traits were shipped to his Nevada ranch where they were broken for riding or teaming.”

Winters definitely sounds like a dedicated go-getter, so what was next in his life? Politics. To finance his run for Nevada governor, he sold land in California.

Because of an abiding dislike on the part of some Nevadans for Californians (which exists to this day), Winters was derogatorily labeled a “carpetbagger” by his opponent who trounced him. In truth, he was as Nevadan as anyone else and didn’t deserve the negativity because of his ingenuity and entrepreneurship.


Sadly, the society said the “political race was the turning point in Winters’ fortunes.”

“The campaign left him heavily in debt, and he had to sell some of his Nevada property,” the society added. “His 17-year-old daughter, Maggie, died of jaundice in San Francisco in 1897. Mrs. Winters, who had borne 10 children, seemed to lose all interest in life after Maggie’s death and died in San Francisco on May 30, 1898.

“Financial problems continued to plague Theodore, and he lost a series of water rights cases which didn’t help.”

The society noted that he suffered a dismal sale of brood mares at the 1899 Nevada State.

“Theodore Winters died at his home in the Washoe Valley on Aug. 3, 1906,” the society noted. “One of his daughters, Neva Winters Sauer, kept the Winters ranch until her death in Sept. 1953.

“The wills of Theodore and Margaret Winters were not probated until after the death of Neva Sauer, and in order to begin settling the estate, the ranch was sold to E. W. Scripps II, prominent newspaper chain magnate.

“Theodore Winters had 12 children, two by his first wife, and 10 by his second,” the society continued. “The children from his first marriage were George and Helen, and by his second wife were Frankie, Nettie, Mark, Nellie, Lou, Neva, Maggie, Archie, Theodora and an infant that lived just a short time.”


In this post are photos of the house and former ranch that once covered 6,000 acres and “included an orchard, horse racetrack and extensive livestock herds,” according to a commemorative plaque at the former Ranch site.

“The house was built by Theodore Winters (circa 1862), who had become wealthy from part-ownership in the Ophir Mine,” according to the plaque that was placed by Snowshoe Thomson Chapter No. 1827, E Clampus Vitas, in 1985.

According to what I believe is an official state of Nevada commemorative plaque (faded, state seal no longer affixed) at the former Winters Ranch site in Washoe Valley, Nev., the house is a Carpenter-Gothic Style structure that was completed in about 1864, which differs from the Winters Historical Society's article. The sign is so faded, it is an embarrassment. The state should upgrade it.

Thursday, December 21, 2023

Old Washoe City's Chocolate Nugget Candy Factory Perfect For Late Christmas Gifts

 


In Old Washoe City there is one of the sweetest roadside attractions that you will ever find.

It is one of the reasons I choose to take the old highway.

And if you are looking for a last-minute Christmas gift, check out the Chocolate Nugget Candy Factory! It's not too late and is minutes from Carson City.

The factory has been “crafting exquisite candies and chocolates since 1936,” according to the company’s nicely designed website.

"The Prospector" at the Chocolate Nugget Candy Factory in Old Washoe City.

“We are proud to be third-generation candy makers,” Ed added. “It all began with our grandfather Frank, who discovered his passion for candy-making after purchasing a kit from a magazine. Using only the finest ingredients, such as pure chocolate, fresh dairy cream, butter and roasted nuts, he created delicious treats that quickly became a sought-after delicacy.”

I bought chocolates for my wife Kathleen there, but I have not yet tried their peanut brittle, which is my favorite candy at such candy stores. You can have all the chocolate you want, but I will take peanut brittle and so would have my late mother.

“One of {Frank’s} signature creations was his thin and crispy peanut brittle, which was famously light as a potato chip,” Ed noted. “Our father Dan continued the legacy by perfecting recipes and developing new ones, while our mother Caroline managed the business alongside him until 2005.

“Today, even though our grandfather and father have passed away, our 80-year-old mother remains an active part of the business.”

That is quite a story that should make not only all Northern Nevadans proud, but all Americans. This is the type of American small family business success story that we should hear a lot more about, wouldn’t you say?

The family that has made this business a Nevada icon for generations said it will continue making scrumptious candy.

“We are committed to maintaining the same high standards that our family has always upheld by using only the best ingredients and the highest-quality chocolate,” Ed noted. “Our award-winning peanut brittle is a testament to our commitment to excellence, and we thank you for being a part of our family by indulging in our premium candies and chocolates.”











Tuesday, December 19, 2023

Nevada's State Capitol Decorated With Christmas Lights; Take Your Photos Downtown!







On one of the nights I visited the Capitol's Christmas lights in Carson City, Nev., it was very windy. I didn't bring my professional cameras, so there is some bur in the branches with the lights. My Samsung is so darn convenient. I hadn't anticipated on going, which makes having a smartphone nice. However, the photos are not always as good as a pro camera and pro lens. If you haven't visited Carson City to see the Downtown Christmas lights, be sure to get down there and see them!

Saturday, December 16, 2023

Reno's Haven On Earth Is Heaven On Earth For Those Seeking Gluten-free Bakery Products!

 

by Glenn Franco Simmons

Haven on Earth Bakery & Deli is a self-described “dedicated gluten free Bakery & Deli” located in southeast Reno, Nev.

It really is a haven for those whose dietary needs require gluten-free products.

“We give a new perspective on gluten free, {which} means without wheat, barley and rye but that has nothing to do with ‘OUR’ taste and texture,” according to the company’s website.


And taste there is, even for those of us who do not require a gluten-free diet. Haven on Earth is still a must-stop for anyone who likes quality baked and deli items. 
There are also yummy hot entrées, delicious salads and sides.

And there is more!

“We now have 10-lb. loaves here,” the website notes. “Gluten-free is a challenge we have met head-on and won! Some of our products include an excellent flax bread, sandwich bread, artisan breads, a complete line of cookies, pastries and even baked donuts. When people taste our baked goods all they say is ‘I’ll be back for more!’”

There are also cakes, pies, holiday orders and more! In fact, there are so many gluten-free bakery products, I encourage you to visit Haven On Earth’s website. Please remember that some items described on a website and offerings in a store may change.

Haven On Earth also emphasizes that because it is a dedicated gluten-free bakery and deli, cross-contamination is not a worry like it may be in some eateries that simultaneously serve gluten and gluten-free products.






Friday, December 15, 2023

Carson City's Christmas Decorations A Must-see















If you have not visited Downtown Carson City to view its brilliantly lit Christmas decorations at the State Capitol, be sure to see it before Christmas, because last year, the decorations came down fast. I will soon have more photos for folks who cannot make to Carson City.

Thursday, December 14, 2023

Yerington's Red Rooster Emporium A Nevada Gem In Beautiful Mason Valley; Awesome For Christmas Gifts!

 



In Yerington, dressed in rustic attire,

Red Rooster’s gems, set Christmas hearts afire.

Antiques, collectibles, a nostalgic spree,

Americana at heart, for you and me.

 

A rooster’s call, crimson, bold and loud,

In this Nevada town, stands proud.

Farm’s treasures and trinkets that enchant,

Every child’s wish, the perfect grant.

 

Shelves of memories, glass shines so clear,

Catching winter’s glow, spreading cheer.

Embroidery threads, in festive hue,

Weave stories old yet feel so new.

 

Large roosters, chickens, adorning yards with glee,

Reflect the soul of the community, you'll agree.

In Yerington’s embrace, beneath the Christmas star,

At Red Rooster's realm, we’re all never far.

 

Mining past, agriculture’s present day,

In each item’s charm, their tales lay.

So come gather round, let your holiday heart roam,

At the Red Rooster Emporium, a Nevada home.

~ Franco


(Poem & photos © Glenn Franco Simmons. Please share, if so inclined.)







Wednesday, December 18, 2019

Washoe Lodge Was Once An Active Nevada Masonic Lodge

Photo of Washoe Lodge #2, courtesy of the University of Nevada Reno. Identification: UNRS-P1991-44-12; Ca. 1863-1888; Collection name W.A. Kornmayer; Collection number, NRS-P1991-44.

Washoe City and the surrounding valley were once known for significant economic and agricultural industriousness.

Within the social milieu of the new decade of the 1860s that saw significant economic changes — before Nevada statehood — were Freemasons who wanted to create a Masonic Lodge in search of that brotherly fraternity that an active lodge can further cement.

"The urge for Masonic intercourse in Washoe City was felt by the sojourning brethren, resulting in the establishment of a lodge under California registry," stated the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Mason of Nevada on its website*. (https://nvmasons.org/history/) "It is inconceivable, but it is nevertheless true, that but small attention was paid by the officers of the Grand Lodge of California, to the organization of Washoe lodge, No. 157 chartered under California register in July 1862."

If I correctly understand the Washoe Lodge's history, it was charted as a Nevada Lodge in 1863, ceasing to be a California-affiliated lodge.


This photo was been cropped on the left to provide a more concise view. Photograph of Washoe City (ghost town) in 1943. The buildings on the right and in the center appear to be in the University of Nevada Reno-confirmed photo of Washoe Lodge #2. Note the three windows in the central building. Courtesy of UNR. Photographer: Gus Bundy. From the UNR Gus Bundy Collection. Image ID: UNRS-P1985-08-01125. Collection ID: UNRS-P1985-08.

"It is interesting to note, that at that time Washoe Lodge had an enrollment of 36 members," according to the Nevada Masons. "Not an unusual numerical list it is true, but among its number were those who were nevertheless sincere and devoted brethren, through whose instrumentalities the lodge grew and spread its Masonic light; men who figured prominently in municipal, county and state affairs, and brought fame and honor to themselves and the section from which they hailed; some of whom afterward crossed over into California, becoming identified with its commercial, industrial, political and social life, adding luster to the honor roll of that state. For, the Masons who pioneered the way in Washoe Lodge were men of outstanding merit and integrity; they took a leading part not only in Masonic affairs, but in public life as well; some of them attained not only public honor, but also became wealthy."

The Nevada Masons' website mentions a few prominent men, so if you want to learn more about them, I strongly suggest you visit the website.

The Lodge cannot be separated from Washoe Valley's and Washoe City's golden days, as noted by the Masons:

"The history of Washoe Lodge begins in the winter of 1860-61, and is cast in that period of glamour and excitement, attendant upon the discovery and development of The Comstock Lode, dating from Jan. 28, 1859, when James Finney, or 'Old Virginia,' made a rich strike in Gold Hill, and Henry Comstock, Patrick McLaughlin, Peter O’Reilly, Emanuel Penrod and Kentuck Osborne came into the picture, and Sandy Bowers and his wife Eilley Orrum, rose to opulence, whose reckless extravagance and final relapse into almost poverty, is a story of human pity and interest." 

In colorful writing, the Nevada Masons' website notes the synergy between the growth of Masonry in Nevada and The Comstock Lode:

"The story of the blue-black clay, secret of the wealth of the Comstock, at first cursed by the miners and thrown upon the dump as worthless — but afterward by an accident found to contain $1,595 in silver, and $4,790 in gold values per ton — precipitat{ed} a 'rush,' the scenes and excitement of which no pen could hope to portray, for they are deep-dyed with the richest color of comedy, pathos and tragedy, acts of heroism, self-denial, intrigue, shame and honor, but inextricably interwoven into the history of Washoe County.

"For when the great discovery was made on Mt. Davidson, or Sun Peak Mountain, Washoe Valley leaped into prominence for it had fuel and timber for building, plenty of water and fine rich land for farming; and from it the Comstock could be and was supplied. It soon assumed importance and following the necessary location surveys made in the spring of 1861, Washoe City came into being, began to grow and for the next five or six years, enjoyed a substantial and steady expansion."

In 1866, Washoe City became the county seat of Washoe County; however, it's a distinction that would be short-lived:

"With the coming of the V. & T. Railway, {Washoe City's} decline commenced," the Nevada Masons note. "Reno wanted the county seat, and on Aug. 5, 1868, a petition signed by 750 residents of Reno was sent to the county commissioners asking for the removal of the county seat to Reno. This petition was denied, but another was framed and sent in February 1870. Washoe City made a protest, and sent William Webster and William Boardman to plead their case, while Thomas E. Hayden appeared for Reno. The petition was withdrawn, but another was soon presented."

A special election was held on June 14, 1870 to settle the matter.

"Reno won by a vote of 544 to 362," according to the Nevada Masons. "Washoe then applied to the courts for redress, resulting in a bill being sent to the Legislature, which was passed, declaring Reno to be the county seat on and after April 3, 1871. It was the doom of the valley city; an early exodus of many of the residents followed, business became stagnant and, while for the next 18 years or more, a settlement continued to exist on the old site of the town, yet its progressive spirit was broken, and one by one its citizens departed to other fields."

Washoe City slowly declined. I've found several photos that may or may not be Washoe Lodge No. 2; however, there is one from the University of Nevada Reno that clearly states it is the site of the lodge. From that photo, it appears that others may also show that building. Any suggestions and/or corrections would be appreciated.

There are many misconceptions about Free & Accepted Masons, so I refer readers to an excellent rebuttal to common fallacies regarding Freemasonry that the Grand Lodge of Virginia published: "Myths of Freemasonry."

* Quotes from the Nevada Masons' website have been edited for AP Style.

Masons are free to use photos I've personally taken however they want, commercially or noncommercially.

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